HunterX Free Download

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HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET I don’t ask for a ton out of games. I really want only two major things for my playtime to be considered a success. First, I want to avoid pointless frustration. Second, I want my time respected. While Orange Popcorn’s HunterX features clever creature design and lots of cool toys to play with, it fails to check off either of my boxes and ends up wasting time and frustrating with aplomb. In an undisclosed city presumably set in the present day, our protagonist Tsuki is called forth to battle hideous monsters and fearsome foes. She has a helper imp/demon/critter for some reason and there’s something about dimensional rifts and… time travel? Tsuki goes through a rift and meets another Hunter (capital H – I am assuming that’s a group of some sort, but we don’t get much information) from the distant (maybe?) past who’s searching for her lost leader, Siegfried. Instead of joining Tsuki on her quest, the other Hunter simply shows up at specific puzzles and says cryptic things, so it’s up to Tsuki to locate Siegfried and defeat the ultimate evil lurking somewhere. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

As one might tell from the above description, the story in HunterX is scant – there’s just a smattering of dialogue throughout the campaign and a few collectible writings that provide some backstory. Like most other 2D Metroidvania-style titles, HunterX requires players to traverse a large map broken up into several level-like sections, each containing a boss, a teleporter, and lots of treasure. Tsuki must find keys to unlock doors, perform light platforming, and defeat hundreds — if not thousands — of enemies along the way. Fortunately, the enemy types are varied, featuring some stunning and memorable designs like otherworldly marionettes, dog creatures with crossbows, and a standout screaming ice lady. The level of detail on character models is impressive, and lot of thought went into their visual style. On the other hand, I wish more detail had gone into the backgrounds, which don’t venture far from humdrum city/castle/cave locations. There is some nice use of lighting effects here and there, but the locations are largely dull.

Gameplay is incredibly smooth

In terms of weaponry, Tsuki has access to an impressive arsenal. Starting with a simple blade, she’s able to unlock (or find) implements such as war hammers, axes, and really cool swords. She supplements these with a variety of magical skills like fireballs, ice knives, and special slashing attacks as she gains experience. The controls are simple, meaning even newer players should be able to execute her most dangerous attacks with ease. While the controls are simple, they are imprecise. Jumping feels too floaty, and attacks are sluggish. HunterX offers a parry mechanic and dash moves, but one is never sure what attacks can actually be parried (some are unblockable!) and many enemies simply move far, too fast to take advantage of dashing as they can either close the distance and attack with impunity, or easily move out of Tsuki’s attack range. Our hero also has the ability to heal herself during battle, but she can be attacked during the animation, meaning those heals can be completely wasted. Gold Rush The Game

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

She can unlock the ability to speed up item/potion use, but she can’t do that until several hours after starting. As this is a Metroidvania, there are a lot of gated areas, especially early on, but the mini-map doesn’t remind players what ability is needed in a specific area, so we are required to remember which rooms we can’t access and also why, and remembering isn’t all that easy since it’s easy to get lost or confused because of the bland backgrounds. One also has to unlock save/upgrade locations by finding them on the map, which wouldn’t be a problem if they were sensibly spaced out. Instead, it’s possible to be defeated by a boss and respawn a dozen or so rooms away, taking upwards of a minute to return to the fray. Adding insult to injury, when defeated by an enemy, Tsuki loses all the unspent experience she was carrying since it can only be used in those specific rooms. The experience can be regained if the player pulls off a successful corpse run, but otherwise it’s gone for good.

Mechanics are very accessible and introduced well

It’s maddening, especially when getting stomped by a nobody on the way back to an already-irritating boss fight. I give the team at Orange Popcorn credit for releasing several major updates designed to combat some of these problems, including the addition of an Easy mode (which unfortunately requires a full restart), but for me it’s too late. Frankly, I think HunterX would make an much better side-scroller with linear progression than the subpar Metroidvania that it is — I may come back to it after a few more patches and when my frustration dies down, but I really can’t HunterX right now, especially with so many other better titles to choose from. In this game, you play as a demon/monster hunter named Tsuki. There are portals to monster places around, and it’s her job to kill things with her questionable two-hit combo while losing all of her currency when she dies. Despite all my playful mockery, HunterX is far from a bad game. Sure, everything it does has been done before and better, but it’s completely competent. GORN

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

You control Tsuki through a bunch of extremely familiar dark fantasy locales while she fights monsters. Everything reeks of Castlevania, but in the most generic way possible. This game has absolutely no identity of its own, and I have little idea or interest in what the plot is. The game doesn’t drop you in a giant overworld, so you’ll be warping to different sections via portal. But each section is decently sized with secrets to find. The level design is passable, although many screens are clearly intended to just be navigated from one side. Going the other way in HunterX may lead to some embarrassing game issues and mishaps. Maybe it’ll be impossible to stop from colliding with a kamikaze enemy due to placement, or perhaps you’ll contend with a bunch of skulls rolling to the left after you enter from the right. Tsuki herself is a generic anime girl and I can’t remember what she looks like off the top of my head. Bizarrely, she initially only has a two-hit combo, which makes the early combat feel overly rigid and limited.

The anime aesthetic lands well for people who are into it

However, she’s got the full suite of 2D Souls-like abilities. She can block, parry (even if the window is so tiny), dash, use a limited number of magical attacks per spawn, etc. Alongside, you also contend with the typical Souls design formula. Currency drops upon death, alongside health potions that function like flasks, and you’re whisked away to your last checkpoint. You use the currency to upgrade a single stat point. Skill points are offered when you level up, and they let you purchase new passives and active abilities. The gameplay is fine, if wholly unremarkable. Enemies that kill you with a quick two-hit combo are damned annoying but, hey, Souls-like.T here’s nothing wrong with HunterX. If you want a 2.5D Souls-like that ticks off all the boxes, it gets the job done in a purely bland, inoffensive way. It’s not boring, and there are some puzzles and the like to spice things up. But there’s also absolutely nothing special or particularly interesting here.

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

HunterX Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

There’s no fancy cutscenes or cryptic mystery at the start – Tsuki, the protagonist, jumps off a rooftop building while her little totally-not-a-magical-girl mascot comments about how much thicker the moon looks. Then it’s straight into the streets and sewers of a Japanese town. The first thing I noticed was how deliberate the controls feel – they aren’t fancy or overwhelming, but perfectly playable on a controller. Every input felt like it was carefully metered, from my jump height to aerial movements. There is a certain floaty maneuverability that Smash Bros players might find familiar, but unlike tournament johns these controls tell you, “If you mess up, it’s your fault.” The movement options might feel limited at first, but as a metroidvania, you gain abilities like aerial dashes as you explore and level up. The souls-like combat translates pretty well to 2D, so far as what I imagine a souls-like game would be. Although it would be cool to see flashy effects like Platinum Games titles, the core combat feels fair and well polished.

Attacks have weight to them even if I tried to spam slashes, while the slight bullet time from parrying feels impactful, deserved, and never tiring to see. Casting spells seem slightly lackluster since you can’t aim them directionally, but they do their job in-combat admirably. Aesthetics are the biggest initial draw to the game. People who aren’t into the Western Fantasy/realistic style of many souls-likes might find this an easier entry point, while fans of both souls-likes and anime will probably enjoy HunterX. The Japanese voice acting is well done and doesn’t feel grating. While I did predict that I’d get tired of the Priestess’ quote when she defeats you, it’s more due to insult on top of injury. The artstyle doesn’t feel uncanny, though the background details are pretty simple as far as 3D assets go. Overall, I would recommend HunterX to people who are looking for a solid entry souls-like experience and are fans of anime. It’s not a flashy game oozing with style like the Persona series, but as far as an indie game goes there’s a lot of quality to like. Grand Theft Auto IV

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