Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download

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Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET Key is known for making visual novels that make people cry, such as Kanon, Clannad, and Air. These games tend to be filled with doe-eyed anime girls with tragic pasts that our hero must unravel across dozens of hours of reading and the occasional mini-game. In contrast, Harmonia features only the first of these tropes, as it is a title that a reader can speed through in about five hours even on the highest of text display settings. This places the title firmly in the realm of kinetic novels, visual novels that have no choice for the player to make in order to influence the plot in one way or another, typically called routes in VN terminology. Key has one other kinetic to their name, the space-themed Planaterian, which runs for about the same length of time and shares a science fiction, robot-themed plot with Harmonia. However, whereas Planatarian is a heart-wrenching story of hope in a dying world, Harmonia just sort of meanders through its plot, unable to make the reader care about its very, very small cast of characters and never really reaching a final destination. As its background goes, the world of Harmonia is a ruinous place where electricity is a rarity and people live simple lives in small towns scattered across a desert backdrop. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

The hero of this tale of ruin is Rei, a young man who awakes one day in an abandon robotics factory and soon finds purpose in his life helping the people of a small town. The plot from here sees Rei helping the people of his new town solves various issues they may have, such as fixing the projector of a local shop owner so he can watch his filmmaker brother’s last film, until secrets begin to be revealed that change his view of not only himself but the small town that he had made his new home.Now part of the problem with Harmonia is just how meandering and slow it is. Rei and his female friends go from one task to another doing things that barely inform the reader of the secrets behind the Mad Max-esque setting. Due to how little time we spend with these characters, you simply go through the story not caring about them, thus rendering most of the plot entirely pointless. Most of the enjoyment that comes from reading Key visual novels comes from getting to know each character, and via the protagonist’s interactions with them, come to care about them and their plights, whatever it may be. In Harmonia however, this simply doesn’t happen.

Harmonia Piano Arrange Album  teneritas.

For most of the game’s six-hour run, we know nothing about them or their past and are left with ciphers that require a key to open that just isn’t there. As by the time the game does spring its big revelation on the reader, it seems both nonsensical and completely pointless. So of the four main characters in Harmonia, none of them are interesting or develop terribly well either. This alone makes Harmonia among the worst of Key’s visual novel offerings and not one I would recommend to anyone. Besides its lackluster plot and characters, Harmonia is a bit strange in that it uses NVL mode (as discussed in my review of Umineko) instead of the custom user interface that looks quite a bit nicer than simply displaying text over character sprites and occasionally to the side of them. Because of this, Harmonia feels unfinished and like it was rushed to market simply because they could. Should it be given a clean up, an actual GUI, and some extended story sequences to explain parts of the game world that are simply left up in the air, Harmonia could potentially become a solid entry in Key’s storied canon of visual novels. As things stand, it is just not worth a gamer’s time or money. Batora: Lost Haven

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Some folks come to video games expecting action-packed excitement. Others look for titles to make them think through logic puzzles or even terrify themselves. Yet, for some reason, games that make you cry aren’t typically desired by mainstream fans. There is an audience for highly emotional titles, though, and developer VisualArts have been making games to cater to this need for years now. Visual novel lovers should know them by their works such as CLANNAD, Tomoyo After ~it’s a wonderful life~ and Planetarian ~the reverie of a little planet~. Their latest release in both Japan and the United States is Harmonia. Unlike some previous releases which they brought west via Sekai Project, this one was self-published to Steam. Because Harmonia is such a new game, visual novel fans weren’t sure what to expect from the storyline or the translation quality. Harmonia begins as our protagonist wakes up in the middle of what appears to be a long since deserted factory. Although he has no memory of how he got there, he quickly pieces things together. The factory once produced Phiroids – humanoid robots which could be considered both servants and companions to humans. Upon looking at his own right hand, he finds that it is completely mechanical.

This young boy awoke to find himself in the remains of what seemed to be a factory.

Aside from where the skin has ripped off, however, everything else about him appears completely human. He hides the fact he is a Phiroid by covering the hand and then seeks out humans to serve, as is a Phiroid’s duty. Once in a tiny, post-apocalyptic town, he meets a young woman named Shinoa who takes him in and names him Rei. The two get to know each other, and Rei in particular finds himself learning about emotions and helping other townsfolk thanks to Shinoa. The storyline gets a bit stranger when other characters are introduced, such as an ever-angry shopkeeper and child who cries continuously while sequestered all alone in a library. Despite being a rather short visual novel, this small handful of characters receive a great deal of development. Over the course of interacting with them, players find themselves getting weirdly attached to the townspeople. Of course, this is needed for VisualArts to eventually pull on everyone’s heartstrings by the end. There are a few important aspects to note for folks who have played previous VisualArts games or are at least familiar with visual novels. Grow Song of the Evertree

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

The main thing is that this is a short story that most could finish in an afternoon. For me, it took three hours to complete the storyline. Given this is a kinetic novel, there are no dialogue choices to make which otherwise lead to a bit of replayability. The single tale is worth reading, but not quite as emotionally impactful as other titles in their catalog. After all, even the best authors would probably have trouble making people weep over characters they only knew for a couple hours. That’s not to say the writing is bad by any means. There is still an emotional impact from all that occurs. With that said, the translation feels slightly off. No, it’s not due to typos, as there are barely any present. Harmonia dodges the literal translation trap which leads to games with highly accurate translations but dreary writing. However, the game falls somewhere in the middle, with text that makes total sense in English but does not flow as poetically as it probably was intended to. One smart choice on the translator’s part was leaving Shinoa’s unique slang. Her usage of colors to refer to emotions, as well as her adorable “powapowa” phrase add to her characterization better than if her uniqueness had been translated away entirely.

The Blue Little Lady from the Library” Tipi.

Just like other games by this company, Harmonia features a truly gorgeous appearance. Each character sprite looks almost as if it was carefully drawn and colored via colored pencils. This high quality “sketch” style emphasizes the frailty of the characters and their world. It also just looks darn good, though there’s not much animation to speak of for the sprites. CG scenes also retain a fantastic look. Despite the short playtime, you’ll see a good handful of beautiful CGs scattered throughout the tale. Music maintains the atmosphere created by the storyline and artwork. Generally mellow, it also conveys moods such as sadness, loss, and joy. Japanese voice acting is also included for all characters (aside from Rei). One weird thing about Harmonia is its UI. Normally, there’s not much to fuss about regarding text options in a visual novel as they’re very standardized. Somehow, though, this game gets it all wrong. The menu options are unusual, for one. Symbols such as a lock and bell are used which are absolutely nonstandard. Even after figuring out what the lock does (I still don’t know what the bell means), there was a whole other issue.

Getting auto text to work was a chore – and it only seemed to function sporadically. If nothing else, auto text is a must, so the action’s finicky nature was certainly annoying. The default in-game text also caused an error message upon first run. Luckily, it was a simple issue to fix. Many pieces of media attempt to evoke certain feelings or emotions in the person consuming it. Maybe its as simple as getting said person to empathize with its characters. Perhaps getting you to feel the same romantic emotions that a protagonist has for a love interest. Or even just trying to awaken a sense of fear or dread within you. A common one in the gaming sphere is evoking the feeling of power, making you believe that you have the strength to singlehandedly take down the Nazi regime or something. What about sadness, though? We do have the catch-all genre of “drama,” in which some works will occasionally try to coax out a few tears from the audience. However, this emotion isn’t usually focused on as much in games. After all, video games are supposed to be fun, right? How is sadness fun? If your definition of fun involves a river of tears, though, the Japanese genre of “utsuge” might be for you!

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Harmonia Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Translating roughly to “crying game,” the goal of games that fall under this category is to make the player cry. How successful they are at accomplishing this goal varies from game to game, though. Actually being able to evoke such a strong emotion can take some serious writing skills, which isn’t always something games are known for. The Japanese visual novel studio Key is quite well-known for creating these utsuge games, and I must be one of those people that finds joy in weeping, as their catalog includes some of my all-time favorite visual novels. Long shying away from releasing their titles outside of Japan, Key has recently begun exporting its work to English-speaking markets. After the apparent success of the English localization of Clannad, which the company released in partnership with Sekai Project, Key has decided to take matters into its own hands in releasing the rest of their catalog overseas. Alongside localization announcements of older games, the company also announced a brand new title that would receive a translation. Unusually, the game was released in English first, with a Japanese release still forthcoming. General Practitioner

ADD ONS/PATCHES AND DLC’S: Harmonia Switch NSP Original Soundtrack

Original Soundtrack Complete Pack Piano Arrange Album – teneritas Theme Song “Todoketai Melody” / “Towa no Hoshi e” Developer Comp for Beta Testing
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