Unity of Command II Free Download

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Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET One of my high bars for a strategy game’s sequel is that I can unreservedly recommend the game over its predecessor. Unity of Command 2 is one of those games; somewhat to my surprise, as I was initially wary of all the new mechanics being added to an otherwise delightfully simple wargame. Unity of Command 2 is a new wargaming standard in every aspect. It has good mechanics, a fun campaign structure, and it even looks quite good to boot. This is a pure wargame: it’s about moving troops and tanks and fighting with no consideration for politicking or ceasefires. Unity of Command 2 has the same baselines that made the first UoC a success. Every division on the battlefield is made up of sections called steps, each represented by a little dot below the unit’s model. Sometimes divisions have ‘specialist steps’ of attached assets—like a detached tank company temporarily assigned to support an infantry division. .TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Steps are either active, a full circle, or suppressed, an empty one. When a unit attacks or defends its active steps are multiplied by their combat value, totaled, and compared to the other unit’s total for the odds of various results. If that sounds complicated, it’s not, because the game just shows you the likely results. Sure, there’s a detailed combat resolution table buried in the manual, but you can happily play this (quite complex) wargame without ever looking at it. That feels very good. On the other hand, it doesn’t do a great job of teaching itself. The basics like combat are easy, but expect some trial-and-error frustration while you figure out how to reassign steps, balance logistics, juggle command range and upgrade your divisions. More detailed, frequent tooltips would have been nice. The interface is good enough though and doesn’t fight the game design—it’s certainly one of the best for a wargame of this kind.

Dynamic Campaign

The combat lets you really focus on what an operations-scale game does best. This is a game about orchestrating breakthroughs, exploiting gaps with armor, and strategically blocking chokepoints. The terrain of the western front isn’t about vast encirclements, it’s about pushing over the mountains of central Italy or struggling through the bocage in Normandy. I found especial pleasure in capturing railway depots and balancing supply dumps to keep up with my advancing forces. A well-planned tank breakthrough once allowed me to take a third of italy with little effort by racing up the coast and cutting off the enemy’s supply—though the paratroops that held the vital bridges along the way didn’t make it. The strategy is very simple to manage but just complex enough that it feels like a challenge. That’s not to say the game as a whole lacks complexity. Farthest Frontier 

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Every section of your army has an HQ unit, a non-combat location that your logistics, intelligence, and command efforts come from. HQs can use their very limited command points to have divisions execute special maneuvers—suppressing artillery fire to pin down enemies, feint attacks, and set-piece assaults to reduce enemy fortifications. For example, I specialized my US 5th Army as a fast force that hit hard and excelled at breaking single points. I consistently used it to exploit gaps, pushing armored divisions into attacks on favorable terrain, but ordering them to make fighting withdrawals in the event of counterattacks. Meanwhile my British 8th Army was an iron wall of artillery that could grind down even the most determined, entrenched enemy. HQs can also deploy portable bridges, organize emergency supplies, and organize motor transport for slow infantry.

Theater Assets

As you play through the game’s campaign these HQs level up, gaining new abilities and more command points. The first Unity of Command’s very basic combat felt like a puzzle sometimes, but the mechanics are refined in UoC2 so that even the initial strategic situations in a scenario can have wildly different solutions, something the first game lacked. It’s much harder—maybe impossible—to find the most efficient way to win any one of this game’s battles. Take the early missions in Tunisia, for example. It might seem obvious that you simply need to break the enemy’s apparently weakest point, and that’s just what I did. It worked, but I lost lots of troops to later fighting because that weak point is quite far from your actual objectives. Next time around I reassigned engineers from all over my forces to divisions sitting opposite a bunch of dangerous Panzer divisions with a river in between. Fernbus Simulator 

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

The engineers allowed them to ignore the river attack penalty and break a hole. Driving tanks through the hole, I captured the enemy’s supply base at Tunis and cut off over half their forces from supply—from there they just starved and stopped fighting. The centerpiece of play is the War in the West campaign, spanning North Africa in 1943 to the close of the western front in 1945. It’s divided into phases of two or three historical operations, like invading Sicily then charging “up the boot” to Rome. During missions you complete objectives—always with a time limit—to earn prestige. Prestige is spent on reinforcements and upgrades for your troops, like artillery pieces and tank companies as specialty steps. Prestige is always in demand, though. Between each set of operations is a conference phase, during which you purchase HQ upgrades and one-shot card powers using prestige.

Deep Operations

Customizable factors like cards and specialists and upgrades lend a lot of flexibility to scenarios and campaigns. There are even a few points of historical divergence, where doing better than the historical figures allows you to take alt-history paths like pushing the Italian front to the alps by mid-1944. I rarely feel the need to replay a wargame of this scope, but I already know I’ll be sinking a lot of time into Unity of Command 2 because it’s clear that strategy isn’t subordinate to simplicity—and that’s rare these days. Each battle features specific objectives to capture with various sub-objectives that will give bonus units or prestige. Your forces will generally outnumber the enemy, but the Axis forces are frequently well-fortified in chokepoints. With unlimited time, these could eventually be cracked with minimal casualties.

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Unity of Command II Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

However, the genius of UoC2 lies in its turn-timer. Depending on the difficulty level, the player only has a few turns to capture secondary objectives, and every turn the player misses capturing a primary objective the prestige value of it falls. This forces decisive action in order to meet these goals, and UoC2 shines in making the player take risks to meet these time constraints. Is it worth potentially losing some divisional strength, or even the whole division, to push across a bridge? The answer to this question would be ‘yes’, more often than not, if these missions were one-offs and not connected. But the other factor that makes these battles so interesting is that all of your units are persistent. Veteran units can be completely destroyed, and only brought back in following missions as smaller, greener units. Each mission also has a score that’s influenced by time spent

Enemies eliminated, and friendly units lost, and the final score will also affect your prestige. The player can go back and attempt a mission again if things went south, but at a penalty to their final score. So in the long run, the player has to weigh their choices to both preserve their forces but also accomplish their objectives. Balancing these two priorities is the core of the game, and making those decisions results in some of the most enjoyable wargaming in recent memory. The units in this game are grouped into divisions (and occasionally brigades) under a specific army HQ. Each unit has a set of stats that covers their attack, defence, move speed, and armour. The unit will also have up to six (sometimes seven) ‘steps’, representing the overall strength of the unit. Fetish Locator Week Two 

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