Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download

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Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET Back in 2012, Q.U.B.E. reminded me of Portal. Now, six years later, the sequel Q.U.B.E. 2 reminds me of Portal 2—and that annoys me. It annoys me because I hate reducing a game to the sum of its (very obvious) inspirations, hate trying to separate one from the shadow of the other, hate lumping together apples and oranges merely because they’re fruit. But Q.U.B.E. 2 and Portal 2 are less apples and oranges, more a mixed crate of Fuji and Honeycrisp apples. There’s a sense of history repeating itself as, like Portal before, the proof-of-concept that was Q.U.B.E. returns with a larger, more complicated sequel—one that sometimes leaves you missing the original’s simplicity. Forget “reminded me of,” actually. Q.U.B.E., short for “Quick Understanding of Block Extrusion,” was the most Portal of all the post-Portal knockoffs. Six years on from its 2012 release, I think we can comfortably make that claim. White rooms, physics puzzles, fancy gloves that let you manipulate the environment—the inspirations were obvious. Too obvious, maybe. Of course, Q.U.B.E. (or just QUBE from here on) had a gimmick: Cubes Duh. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

The whole world was built from them. Armed with the aforementioned fancy gloves, you could move or interact with certain blocks. Orange cubes, for instance, could be pulled out (extruded) from the wall to form a ledge. Blue cubes launched players and objects around the environment. Green cubes spat out standalone blocks, which could weigh down switches or let you jump to a higher ledge. So far, so Portal. “With a twist,” sure, and the puzzles were decent enough, but it’s pretty telling that most actions in QUBE had an analog in Portal prior. And to be honest, I don’t think QUBE intended to break out of Portal’s shadow. Hell, the original version of QUBE barely had a story. It wasn’t until 2014’s QUBE: Director’s Cut, two years after the initial release, that the game got proper voiceover narration and some semblance of coherence. The initial 2012 version was basically “Portal-style puzzles for people who like Portal-style games,” and nothing more. QUBE 2 is quite a bit larger, at least in scope. All you have to do is look at it. Gone are the blank white walls of its predecessor. The world-made-out-of-cubes look remains, but now in darker tones, rougher, like stone or concrete instead of future-plastic.

Q.U.B.E. 2 Original Soundtrack.

The closest real-world parallel is Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mayan-themed Ennis House, which most famously inspired the interior of Deckard’s apartment in Blade Runner. It’s unique and eye-catching, especially in combination with Unreal 4’s always-stunning lighting effects. More detailed environments aid in telling a more complicated story, too. The Director’s Cut laid some groundwork, establishing the cube as an enormous spaceship hurtling towards Earth, prompting you to blow it up, and then casting doubt upon whether that was the right move or not. QUBE 2 picks up on those threads. Here, you play as Amelia Cross, an archaeologist who somehow awakens on a strange and dusty red planet and is forced to shelter in another enormous cube structure. Surprise: More puzzles inside—and more morally dubious voices on your radio. It’s something approaching a tragedy that no Nintendo platform has ever played host to one of Valve’s two Portal games. All platform allegiances aside, these are two of the finest first-person physics puzzlers ever committed to ones and zeros. Fortunately, they’re also two of the most influential. Nintendo fans were able to reap the benefits of Portal’s considerable cultural impact with Q.U.B.E: Director’s Cut, which had clearly learned an awful lot from Valve’s masterpieces.Farming Simulator 22 PS5

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Now the sequel is here for Switch, and it’s an even richer, more accomplished affair that manages to get a little closer to Portal’s magic. You play the role of Amelia Cross, an archaeologist who awakes in a vast alien structure with no memory of how she got there. If that wasn’t sufficiently disconcerting, she (that is, you) finds that she’s wearing a power suit that enables her to interact with arcane machinery. Most notably, she can imprint square pads dotted around each cavernous room with colour-coded attributes. Blue squares become bounce pads, red squares extend as platforms, and green squares spawn their own solid cubes. By combining these skills, you can solve the game’s many room-sized puzzles. For example, you might drop a green cube onto an angled blue bounce pad to land on top of a red platform, thus forming a makeshift staircase. You may even need to follow said green cube through the air in a feat of first-person gymnastics that’s very reminiscent of – you guessed it – Portal. You’ll also encounter a bunch of additional gadgets that enable you to modify these cubes and the rooms they’re in. These include pressure-sensitive switch pads, movable wall and floor panels, vast floor fans and oil slick shooters.

Explore diverse environments that expand the Q.U.B.E. world.

Figuring out the delicate interplay between all of these different systems is crucial to success in Q.U.B.E. 2, alongside a hefty dose of good old lateral thinking. Fortunately, developer Toxic Games has paced the reveal of these systems and the ramping up of their complexity to nigh-on perfection. Experiences will vary depending on your aptitude, of course, but we made steady, gently taxing progress deep into the game’s six hour-or-so running time before we hit our first stop-dead snag. And even then, it turned out to be a fairly simple solution that we’d only overlooked through initial absent-mindedness. Q.U.B.E. 2 works largely because its mechanics are so solid. Everything behaves as it should, and we only encountered one or two occasions where we had to attempt something a second time because a block didn’t behave quite like it should have done. We did much prefer playing using the Pro Controller over the default Joy-Con, though. You’ll be doing a lot of fine aiming at distant, barely-exposed panels using the right analogue stick, and the right-hand Joy-Con simply felt too imprecise for the job. You can adjust the sensitivity in the menus, though. Far Cry 4

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

which should mitigate your woes if you’re struggling. Control quirks aside, Q.U.B.E. 2’s world feels pleasingly coherent. Credit should go to Toxic Games for creating an atmospheric, believable fiction out of fairly simple building blocks. The stark, sterile environments of the early game are convincingly alien, while moving to a more lush and naturalistic palette later in the game proves no less wondrous. There’s even space for a compellingly mysterious story, delivered over your suit’s comms system. It’s nothing particularly original, and at times it’s quite apparent that it’s merely stitching together a series of self-contained physics puzzles in a rudimentary fashion. But there’s nothing wrong with economy or restraint in video game storytelling, and Q.U.B.E. 2 turns out to be greater than the sum of its parts on this front. Generally speaking, the game looks and sounds superb. Again, there’s a degree of economical thinking on display here, with the developer leaning into and owning the whole blocky aesthetic. But there are also moments of stark beauty, typically executed through the application of smart lighting and the sparing use of otherworldly music. Incongruous elements like a great tree or a creepy statue also prove evocative.

Interact with new and improved game mechanics.

Back in 2015, up against the likes of FIFA, Football Manager and Forza Horizon 2, the BAFTA for best sports game went to this innovative little skateboarding game from developer roll7. Originally released for the Vita in 2014, it was followed by a sequel the next year and both games now find themselves on Nintendo’s Switch, cleverly titled Switch Stance. Unlike games like Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater that require complex button inputs in a 3D space, OlliOlli is a sidescrolling game all about simplicity. Flick the control stick in any direction to perform a trick; hit the B button for a balanced landing. And that’s it! Yet there’s plenty of mileage here, with multiple worlds comprising short stages that each require different objectives to beat: top scores, huge trick combos, and collectable markers. It emphasises timing and rhythm above all, with simple, clean graphics and a cool techno soundtrack. The sequel ups the ante, with more stylish graphics and an ‘Olliwood’ cinema theme that sees you flicking and tricking your way through fantastical film sets and hilarious puns. More so, it introduces manuals that allow you to extend combos between jumps and grinds for more intricate – and rewarding – play.

There’s even a multiplayer mode and a single trick mode to vary things up. Short levels, swift load times and addictive gameplay make this perfect for gaming on the go. Portal is undoubtedly one of the most influential puzzle games out there, to the point where it helped define a whole new style of puzzle games – those playable from the first-person perspective. Similar to how Portal was designed around puzzles involving portals, you have games like The Talos Principle that consists of puzzles involving lasers, and also The Witness that centres on puzzles involving lines. Q.U.B.E. 2 employs similar mechanics; in this game, you solve puzzles involving cubes. This whole puzzle adventure starts with Amelia Cross, an archeologist, finding herself trapped inside a weird alien facility. Unsure about what happened in the past, or how she ended up there, the story slowly unfolds as she progresses through the many puzzle rooms inside the building – mostly through the dialogues she has with another survivor. In general, Q.U.B.E. 2 presents an intriguing narrative that raises a number of questions, but doesn’t necessarily answer these questions in a satisfactory way.

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Thankfully, though, the narrative feels more like a background element, as the main focus of the game lies within its unique and entertaining puzzle mechanics. Similar to Portal, Q.U.B.E. 2’s campaign consists entirely of a (not always linear) sequence of segmented puzzle chambers. Each one presents the player with a unique challenge, applying new twists to how you mix and apply the main elements of the game – the cubes. Amelia is equipped with some special gloves, which can change the colour of specific quadricular boards, and activate them. As you progress, your options broaden, until you have three different colours. Blue adds a bouncing property to the board, allowing you (or objects) to be propelled up or forward. Orange doesn’t do anything by itself, but when activated, can make platforms appear. Green works in a similar way, but creates cubes that can be affected by gravity and other elements at will. In addition to this basic triad, Q.U.B.E. 2 adds an impressive amount of pieces to the puzzle, such as moving platforms, interactive panels, propelling vents, and more. Thanks to this, the game manages to surprise and stay fresh during the whole five hours that it takes to finish the campaign. Lost Judgment

ADD ONS/PATCHES AND DLC’S: Q.U.B.E. 2 Switch NSP Season Pass

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