Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download

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Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET Bars are a good spot to find three things: beer, women and pool tables. Eidos is bringing the latter two to the PlayStation Portable by way of Pocket Pool, a billiards title that combines the leisurely game with half-naked women. But don’t run out and pick up a 12-pack just yet The mechanics of pool work much like they do in practically any other billiards title on the market. You line up your shot, set the power and cue placement and swing away. We’ve seen it before, and there’s honestly not much that can be done to the basic game of pool itself that would change this much. What matters most then in any billiards game is how well the physics and presentation work, and what sort of game options you have. As far as game options go, Pocket Pool has a decent selection. From 8 or 9 ball to straight pool to snooker to killer (a.k.a. cutthroat), most classic pool games are here for the playing. Unfortunately, you can’t make up your own game on the fly, and there aren’t any trick shot options to partake in. When practically every other pool title on the market has a trick shot mode, you’d expect to see it here as well.TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

and that just isn’t the case. The actual mechanics when it comes to playing a game are quite standard. By default, your cue ball has a highlighted targeting beam that shows where it’ll hit another ball, though you can optionally turn on a one-bounce beam as well, showing you where the cue ball will go after it strikes a ball or a table wall. It won’t, however, show you what will happen to the ball you strike, so you’ll have to line up everything by eyesight. A number of camera modes are available to help you do this, though aside from the down-the-cue and overhead cameras, they’re worthless. One issue that we have with this is that you can’t zoom in on the target ball to get a good look at its lie, which is especially important when it’s right up against a bumper. There’s also an issue with dialing-in your aim. You can only use the D-Pad for aiming, and it can be hard to perfectly line up a shot with a ton of green between you, the ball and the pocket. The physics are also quite suspect. By default, the game is set to the “slow” ball speed, which means that when a ball comes in contact with another, it will stop practically dead in its tracks. This is entirely unrealistic and not much fun.

Multiplayer for up to 4 players on one console.

On the other end of the spectrum, the “fast” setting plays like the felt is made of ice. “Medium” is a decent in-between, but you need to set it before each and every game you play. Why is there no main options screen where you would choose this as a default? Balls also bounce in odd manners from time to time, firing off at right angles from the table bumpers. A ball that should careen off at a 45 degree angle may fire straight out from the side and totally screw up a shot. We had one shot where a ball narrowly missed dropping into a pocket and bounced between its angled sections. But rather than bouncing a few times before stopping right near the hole, the ball actually shot out of the hole at a completely unrealistic angle and left our ball in the middle of the table. Argh. In addition to these faults, there are a number of other presentation issues with Pocket Pool. Icons that represent your player’s head and the angle of your shot (who cares?) fill up the lower left and right-hand corners. These fade out when you move the cue, but quickly come back in and prevent you from really staring down a shot. You can press Select to turn them off.Smurfs Kart Switch NSP

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

But you need to turn them back on again to gain access to the power and cue position meters, so you’ll constantly have to toggle them on and off. When you go to save, the game always asks you if you want to delete files from your Memory Stick, even if you have gigs of free space. It also always asks you to name the file before you pick the save slot, even if you intend to keep the same name in the end. As you haven’t picked the slot yet, it always starts with a generic name that you need to replace if you’re keeping multiple saves. As far as multiplayer goes, you’re able to play over WiFi, but you aren’t able to play a hot-seat game on one system. Why? No game of pool has players going at the same time, so why isn’t this an option? Simply unforgivable. And lastly, the unlockables… By winning games, you can unlock new sets of balls, new tables, extra sticks and so forth, as well as gallery images and videos of second-rate, trashy models. The gallery images viewer is about as basic as possible, not allowing you to zoom or rotate images, and the movie player simply starts or stops. The video quality is reasonable, but the videos are boring as hell. Imagine the slowest shots possible with no nudity to be found anywhere and you’ll have an idea of what we’re talking about.

50 unique, creative levels.

It’s going to take a certain kind of self-hating individual to wring any drop of enjoyment out of Eidos’ Pocket Pool. Let’s start with the basics. For one, as a portable pool game, Pocket Pool is terribly underwhelming. It’s got several variations of the game, to be sure, but its mechanics and physics are so wonky and unpleasant that any potential gameplay enjoyment is quickly squashed. But let’s say you’re the masochistic type and are willing to suffer through any amount of bad gameplay to get to what Pocket Pool’s purported prize is: photos and videos of sexy models. Fine, sure, why not? Here’s why not: The unlockables happen to be complete garbage. These are cut-rate models gyrating and posing in such utterly boring fashion as to make early-’90s swimsuit calendar videos look like Larry Flynt concoctions in comparison. Suffice it to say, Pocket Pool has about zero going for it in any category. Just in case that wasn’t enough to scare you off, let’s go a little deeper. Pocket Pool is innocuous enough on boot up. When you start a game, you’re presented with several pool variations, such as 8-ball, 9-ball, 15-ball, rotation, snooker, and the like. DRAGON BALL Z KAKAROT

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

You then get to mess with some options, such as the location you’re going to play in, table type, cue type, ball set (none of these matter, as they’re all generic and ugly), and ball speed. Ball speed is the one you’re really going to want to pay attention to. The default option is slow, and on this setting, balls feel overly heavy and don’t get much bounce at all. The high setting turns them into ping pong balls and has them flying all over the place. The medium setting is the only playable one (and since there’s no savable options menu, you’re going to have to manually select it each and every time you play–which, hopefully, is exactly zero times), but even it doesn’t feel quite right. Balls on this setting still have a tendency to feel overly heavy and not bounce quite enough to be realistic. Breaks, for instance, don’t break up the rack nearly as much as they should, even when you ramp up your shot power all the way. The on-the-table action just never feels quite right as you play, and it often leads to your missing all but the most straightforward shots. The game’s control scheme doesn’t offer up many surprises. Unlike some games, which have used the analog stick to measure power or wind up for a shot, Pocket Pool uses a basic power meter that you can bring up by holding down the circle button.

Simple and addictive gameplay.

You just press up on the D pad until you get the power you want, then press right on the D pad to take your shot. Cue movement is relegated to the D pad as well, so you may find getting more subtle angles on shots frustrating, as the movement tends to be a bit stiff compared with games that use the analog stick for this sort of thing. You can adjust a few things like spin and angle, but you’ll rarely need to use these mechanics except for very late in games. There’s an aim assist feature that shows exactly where the cue ball will connect with a specific ball, but it doesn’t give any hints as to where the ball you’re hitting might end up, so it’s not especially helpful. There are camera angles to play with, but the only useful one is the standard first-person perspective, as most of the other angles don’t give you much perspective on where a shot might actually end up, and the overhead view is too zoomed out to let you figure out proper angles. Computer opponents are perhaps the oddest thing in the game. There are a variety of characters to play as and play against, most of which are headshots of some of the models in the game (though, weirdly enough, there are some guys to pick from as well).

All have text profiles that are funny for all the wrong reasons, and all come at you with some appropriately awful banter as you’re playing. However, the really odd thing is the unpredictability of the artificial intelligence. There are some matches in which computer opponents will forget what game they’re playing and miss on a constant basis, and there are some in which they’ll start channeling Jeanette Lee and making the most patently ridiculous bank shots you will ever see. There’s little rhyme or reason as to how this will go, except that it seems like the AI is better at certain pool variations than others. Basic pool and 8- and 9-ball seem to be strengths, whereas snooker variations appear to be weaknesses. Regardless, the AI is either too overwrought or too brain-dead to be any fun to play against either way. You do have the option to play ad hoc against a friend, but subjecting anyone else to the lousy presentation and clunky physics of Pocket Pool is a good way to lose a friend. It’s easy to assume the moral high ground about scantily clad, superficially attractive girls in video games, either because it serves some affected, above-it-all sense of self or because one truly invests in a conservative morality.

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Pocket Pool Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

But the fact is that lots of young men like scantily clad girls, and lots of young men play video games. Publishers in pursuit of sales will, from time to time, put these two interests together and hope for the best. (I should note here that by “young men,” I mean ages 18 and up. The ESRB designation for Pocket Pool is M, Mature, rated for ages 17 and up, measuring by what I’d call a fair yardstick, since some of the materials in the unlockable content are indeed, thus quoth the ESRB, “prolonged scenes of graphic sexual content.” It’s nothing obscene, per se, by any reasonable standard, but if you ask me and I must act in loco parentis on a grand scale, this should have been an AO, Adults Only, title, and Pocket Pool is not for gamers who are not old enough to sue or be sued.) The first such console title acquiring a particular infamy — although certainly not the first video game of its kind — was BMX XXX, known more as a bad game than a bad influence, rather not being as nasty as it wanted to be. The extreme sports game featured in-game graphics of women in various risqué attire and unlockable video content of real girls in similar circumstances. So goes Pocket Pool, marrying a sport, loosely defined, with girls in various states of undress, and unlockable content at a more or less soft-pornography level. Mount and Blade 2 Bannerlord 

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