Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download

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Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET It’s not a surprise to learn that Journey to the Savage Planet’s creative director last worked on Far Cry 4. The two games are made broadly out of the same pieces: a lush explorable map, some light looting and crafting, and a satirical story as the backbone to hold it all up. But where the Far Cry series has increasingly revolved around a single loop – go to map marker, shoot things at map marker, pick up loot – Journey to the Savage Planet attempts to explode that notion by using its open-ish world far more liberally. It succeeds, for a while. There’s still combat, but Journey to the Savage Planet’s world is also used as a platform for non-guided exploration, puzzle solving, scavenger hunts, and loads of fart jokes. Perhaps its biggest fault is that, as time goes on, it feels as though it can’t quite escape the inexorable gravitational pull towards combat video games so often have, ending with a feeling of ‘cut-price Far Cry’, rather than the grand science fiction experiment it could and perhaps should have been. You wouldn’t know that upon starting out, however. Journey to the Savage Planet opens with a comedic flourish – a pleasingly overblown FMV featuring the CEO of Earth’s fourth-best interstellar exploration company informs you that you’ve landed, er, ‘heavily’ on a planet, codenamed AR-Y 26, that could be used to resettle our species. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Your job is to explore it, catalogue its flora and fauna, and see if there’s some kind of cosmic sludge lying around that you can use to refuel your ship and head home. With a certain inevitability, you soon discover that something else has visited AR-Y 26 before you, and your primary mission becomes to find out what it was, why it left gigantic structures all over the place and, perhaps most importantly, why it isn’t here anymore. It’s an intoxicating set-up, prodding you into its well conceived (if slightly low-rent) pulp sci-fi world – monsters that liberally spray Nickelodeon gunge, giant mushrooms, inexplicably floating islands and all – teaching you how to get around, and then pretty much leaving you alone. There’s a very broad, but not unenjoyable, satire at work behind all this, showing a version of future humanity devoured and repurposed by mega-corporations – which becomes just a touch ironic when you consider that the developer was bought by Google shortly before release. Spliced DNA Initially, Savage Planet offers the literal upward momentum and bright palette (both in colour and and emotion) of Grow Home, the slowly uncovered alien history/conspiracy of Outer Wilds, and the gameified taxonomy of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’s Sheikah Slate camera.

Play with a friend.

Ultimately, all those inspirations amount to watching a series of numbers tick up in the form of a naked quest to discover 100% of places (which, delightfully, fills your ship with postcards for them, illustrated like ‘70s novel covers), find 100% of the buried bits of alien technology, and see 100% of nature’s cruellest mistakes. That’s no bad thing, however, if the pursuit of 100% is fun along the way. When Savage Planet begins, it absolutely is. I spent most of my opening hours obsessively scanning wildlife, working out what was coming out of the unidentified egg sacs I kept popping (turns out it’s a series of seeds, used for the likes of bouncing, grappling, or gluing prey to the floor), and returning to my ship/hub, the Javelin, to watch the Justin Roiland-flavoured adverts for dystopic products that play on every screen when you walk in. I spent almost none of those hours doing what Savage Planet asked me to, and I was very rarely reminded that I should be doing something else. It was great. Typhoon Studios’ Journey to the Savage Planet was very well received when it originally released back in January of this year on PC and consoles; it’s a genuinely funny and supremely well designed title that combines Metroidvania elements with No Man’s Sky-style procuring of resources on a bizarre alien planet filled with slick puzzles and smart platforming action.Partisans 1941

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

This Switch port may have had to dial back on the graphics quite considerably in places and definitely struggles to stick to its target 30fps a little along the way, but overall, the strength of the excellent core gameplay here transcends any of these technical shortcomings. This is an adventure that absolutely holds up, even in this slightly compromised state. In Journey to the Savage Planet you assume control of an employee of Kindred Aerospace, the “4th best interstellar space exploration company”, who has landed on the planet ARY-26 – damaging their ship in the process – and must now investigate their surroundings, observing and cataloguing the local flora and fauna in order to determine whether the world is fit for human habitation whilst scavenging for the vital resources necessary to fix their ride home. On your initial foray outside the confines of your spacecraft you discover that the planet – assumed devoid of intelligent life by Kindred – has a mysterious tower at its centre and it’s your journey to discover the truth behind this enormous alien monument that drives the game’s narrative forward. Gameplay consists of scanning every creature, plant and structure that you come across – gathering data that’s then collated into your “Kindex” – as well and hoovering up as much of ARY-26’s four critical resources – aluminium, carbon, silicon and a special alien alloy – as you can in order to 3D print and upgrade various gizmos that allow you traverse further into the planet’s vibrant interior.

Explore and catalog the flora and fauna.

There’s an immediately satisfying gameplay loop that takes shape here; an excellent blend of relaxed FPS action, platforming and puzzle-solving that’s enhanced at every turn by the game’s excellent sense of humour. Upon leaving your Javelin ship for the first time you’ll need to collect some carbon and silicon from a nearby cave in order to craft your trusty Nomad Pistol and blast through some alien icicles to gain access to the planet proper. You’ll then be tasked with finding the resources necessary to create a jump pack that allows you to successfully navigate the tricky platforms that’ll lead you further on towards your objective. And this is how the game continues; you’re constantly required to find some resource to upgrade your equipment if you’re to navigate ARY-26’s terrain successfully – your central objective always to reach and ascend the monolithic tower whilst at the same time undertaking all manner of side-quests and scientific research requests from Kindred that reward you with the tools necessary to get there. The platforming and light-hearted shooting feels great, tools are cleverly worked into smart environmental puzzles, enemy engagements are fun without being overly difficult and the game strikes a nice balance between being tricky enough to make you think whilst not holding you back so much you become frustrated.Exanima

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

You’ll also unlock plenty of teleporters across the planet that make skipping around areas and returning to your ship to craft items a breeze. As well as collecting the necessary bits and bobs to upgrade your kit, you’ll also constantly use the alien environment and its kooky collection of inhabitants to your advantage, and in this respect, ARY-26 is positively teeming with useful plants and animals. Bombegranate plants, for example, grow little bombs which you can use to blow open cracks in walls (you’ll need to upgrade your gloves before you can handle them for any useful length of time, though), there are vitality plants to shoot in order to regain health, seed bags that drop grapple seeds which can be affixed to surfaces and used as grapple points (once you’ve 3D printed your grapple tether) and all manner of other flora and fauna to help you on your way. The local inhabitants, most especially the cute little Pufferbirds who you’ll find yourself constantly surrounded by, have their uses, too. Feed a Pufferbird some Grob – the metamorphological food paste – and it’ll very noisily poop out some carbon for you to collect, but you’ll also be forced to act in much more cruel ways, shepherding these cute little guys towards areas that are gated off by carnivorous Meat Vortex plants before lining them up and booting them up and into the jaws of the ever-hungry vortex in order to open the way forward.

No Expense Spared.

This delightfully dark sense of humour pervades most aspects of the game, from your twisted engagements with local wildlife, the hilariously dark company adverts and CEO speeches you can watch back aboard your ship and the constant nagging and patronising of your AI companion E.K.O – who can be switched off if her brand of irritating Claptrap-esque comedy isn’t completely your cup of tea. Typhoon Studios have nailed a really nice mix of Borderlands-style swagger with the addictive resource gathering and exploration of No Man’s Sky, dungeons and puzzles of Zelda and some cleverly designed Metroidvania aspects. This isn’t – as it may appear at the outset – some huge open world to endlessly roam around; it’s more a carefully designed series of bespoke areas that open up to you as you solve their puzzles, traverse their dungeons and acquire the tools necessary to push the game’s mystery forward. You still have plenty of freedom to wander – it’s just on a much smaller scale than in some of the games that have very obviously inspired it. I wander around the planet’s colorful surface, cataloguing the local flora and fauna and collecting resources by slapping and blasting aliens to death. Back on Earth, my boss watches my findings roll in, and modifies my mission accordingly. What starts as a quick survey mission quickly becomes a planet-spanning quest to bring him back a powerful artifact.

I have the option to ignore him, of course. All I really need to do is refuel my ship and fly home. I’m warned that I’ll be ravaged on social media if I do, however, and this threat is followed up by an ending that’s — well, let’s just say it’s unsatisfying if I decide to go through with it anyway. Escape is an option, but I have to keep working for the man in the game if I want to keep playing the game in real life. The existential void of late capitalism isn’t new thematic ground for games these days, but that hasn’t prevented Journey to the Savage Planet’s creators from finding new angles from which to stare into the abyss. The exploding ugly-cute alien creatures, the interstitial commercials, my AI overseer, or even just the way my character flails his arm around for a slap attack all plant a smile on my face throughout the 15 hours or so it takes me to complete the game. Through this journey, I use plants, rock formations, and the guts of local animals to upgrade myself from hapless Pufferbird slapper to menacing resource harvester. I get an exhaust-spewing jetpack, an exceptionally lethal pistol, and a Proton Tether that will remind folks of Link’s Hookshot. Navigation and exploration are familiar and comfortable, and I’m soon running, leaping, and climbing across the surface of the planet from objective to objective.

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Journey to the Savage Planet Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

If I wander a little off the main path, I discover secrets, platforming puzzles, and extra resources. I can’t reach them all at first, but each area is dense enough with optional challenges that I rarely feel barricaded down the obvious main path. The self-consciously bright and cheery criticism of capitalism and worker exploitation might have bogged down a lesser game, but the feeling of simply playing around in the planet’s untamed environments is itself a joy. Even while it confronts me with email reminders about my current crippling debt, the game never forgets to be fun first. The act of doing my job doesn’t have to be grim, even if the job itself doesn’t offer much hope for the future. Which may make Journey to the Savage Planet one of the more effectively absurd games in recent memory. From my funhouse-mirror caricature of a CEO to the gentle arc of a punted space chicken disappearing over the horizon, it always strikes the right balance of funny, fun, and cautionary. It never stops to dwell on its existential undercurrents, but it doesn’t gloss over them either. It’s like a cute version of The Outer Worlds with just a hint of No Man’s Sky mixed with Borderlands humor while emphasizing on one great planet instead of infinite mediocre ones. Or Subnautica without as much water. Somehow the game managed to combine all the things I liked about No Man’s Sky, Outer Wilds and Astroneer in a funnier, lighter and more intriguing package.Rick And Morty Virtual Rick-ality

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