Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download

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Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET Metroidvanias have gone through a great revival in the last few years, with titles such as Ori and the blind forest, Hollow Knight, and Dead Cells dominating the scene. So, it is normal that more and more developers each day try their bit on the field. Jordan Morris, the creator of Mister Morris Games, is one of these developers, so he brought Haiku, the robot to life with the help of a Kickstarter campaign. The game fits the classic Metroidvania style, with an enormous world to explore, lots of items to backtrack for and some great bosses to try and defeat. Yet, it has a lot of twists and unique properties that only an indie game could hope to achieve. Right off the bat, the game throws you into a post-apocalyptic world dominated by machines called Arcadia. Humans are nowhere to find and a virus is spreading through the world and infecting every machine. Then, you, a little round robot with a sword, must be the one to go out and fix everything. At the start, this Metroidvania throws a bunch of lore in your face. You see an enormous nuclear explosion that took place 200 years ago and a small poem about the apocalypse. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Later, a strange, unfamiliar voice awakens you and the game starts. As you progress through Haiku, the robot you will learn that the story is way more complex than it seems. You will learn about what really happened in the past, how the virus was created and spread and you might get a spicy plot twist or two. However, at times, the story is confusing. You may feel you must have missed something that explains this or that or that you need to explore further to learn more about it. Some parts of the story are left for the player’s interpretation and others may just be missing…for now. In the end, you will have answers, but also a lot of questions, and doubts. The story will probably leave you awaiting for more. If something shines over other aspects of the game it’s the gameplay. I have to be honest, when I learned this was Jordan Morris’ first game I was skeptical; but, oh boy is the gameplay great. You get the Metroidvania basics: an attack, a dash, a jump, and… a ball? Yeah, well, maybe transforming yourself into a ball and rolling into oblivion isn’t truly basic. Anyway, the fluidity of the movement and the amount of options you have to move around and fight is pretty good.

Classic side-scrolling action with all the modern trimmings.

I would honestly compare it with Hollow Knight’s. Of course, as you dive further and deeper into the game, you will unlock new moves (such as a double jump, or a wall jump) and these are quite balanced with enemy difficulty. Fighting feels amazing (even if you have only 2 attack options) and the bosses are pretty decent (although they might get repetitive after some point). And all of this system comes down to three things: your chips, your heat meter, and your spare parts. Haiku, The Robot is a 2D Metroid-style game with melee combat, platforming, and a few interesting tricks up its metallic sleeve. However, it doesn’t do a great job of giving you clear objectives to aim for; you’re largely left to explore its expansive world and map as you see fit. For some, that freedom may be liberating, but others are likely to find it frustrating. As you explore a series of interior spaces, like water ducts, an incinerator, and a factory, you need to find map data, defeat bosses, and collect upgrades. Annoyingly, the map terminals that you smash apart to reveal each area are themselves sometimes hidden away. New abilities you can earn include turning into a ball, wall jumping, and teleporting short distances. Batora: Lost Haven

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Many abilities, including a dash move that you start with, fill up your heat gauge and when it’s at capacity, you have to wait for it to cool down. You can also equip your little robot with chips that provide a variety of buffs and perks. While you eventually find a few more ways of damaging enemies, your primary weapon throughout is a short-range sword slash, which starts to grow stale pretty quickly. One aspect that I actually really liked about Haiku, The Robot is how its central currency, spare parts, can be used at any time to heal back any damage you take at a small cost. The rest can be spent at shops on new chips, extra slots for chips, and heart container pieces, or the robotic equivalent, I suppose. Fast travel options do show up, and more than a dozen NPCs that you encounter help to fill in the game’s backstory. Without a doubt, there’s a charm to the game’s protagonist and enemies, who mostly seem like scrap heap refuse come to life. The openness of Haiku is both its strength and its weakness, and some who get drawn in by its Metroidvania trappings and retro look will be let down by the lack of direction provided.

Dodge, dash, and slash through machine-like enemies.

Those who don’t mind experimenting and backtracking will find a more satisfying experience, but about halfway through I felt like I had already had my fill. Aesthetically, the clean presentation is an asset, but the soundtrack lacks punch and variety. Ultimately, even though Haiku, The Robot does play well, it can be tedious more often than it is compelling. Haiku the Robot is a Metroidvania-style game made by Mister Morris Games where you’re trying to stop an evil virus from corrupting the underground world of robots. If you’re looking for a light action-platformer with colorful pixel art visuals to spend your weekend on, this may be the game for you. The gameplay is your standard Metroid/Castlevania style game: start with minimal powers and strength and increase it throughout Haiku, making you backtrack to hidden areas you weren’t able to reach before. I used a controller during my seven hour playthrough, and the controls were pretty solid, besides the fact that you get stuck facing the wrong way if you’re using a joystick. Grow Song of the Evertree

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

There is a slight problem when you first open up the game: none of the computer controls are assigned automatically. I’m not sure you can change the controller layout, so I was fine there, but anytime where the game said to use a button to perform an action it said “error” because there was no key assigned. Very strange that there weren’t assigned keys to start with. It also ruined the mystery about what moves there was going to be. The moveset is almost a complete rip from Hollow Knight, actually almost the whole game is. Obviously the levels are different as well as the art, but the main premise is basically a copy. That’s not to say it’s bad, however, it just feels more like a fan game. There are some things that make it different, like how you can heal a lot easier, as well as save your money better. It also doesn’t do the terribly annoying thing of having you retrace your steps to get all your money when you die (which I thank it for). That mechanic does make Haiku a lot easier, however. It’s no way as brutal as Hollow Knight. One of the difficulties of creating a large world to explore is making it believable. Playing through Haiku I’m left with more questions than answers.

Customize your playstyle through the chip system.

The main storyline is simply “Nuclear bomb went off, so…robots.” There isn’t much to the story at all, and the connection with the main character is paper-thin. Why is my name Haiku? Where did I get this sword? What is my purpose in the world? With a small game compared to other Metroidvanias, each location should be hinting to the player of a hidden story. The biggest motivating factor with Metroidvanias is mystery. There needs to be enough motivation for me to backtrack somewhere, whether that’s where the next bit of story is, or that I have new powers, or a mixture of the two. Due to the lack of narrative, it’s difficult to create scenery that emphasizes the story. This might be a situation you can find in most games where backtracking is prevalent, but there was a good amount of time I spent aimlessly wandering around. There’s an awkward space within certain areas of the world that really needed a train I could quickly get to. Maybe to save some wandering I had tokens I could place on the map to remind myself to go back to those areas? There’s equipment that hints at important things I haven’t explored yet, but just seeing a question mark doesn’t tell me if I have the ability to explore that place.

While the story left me wanting something with a little more substance, the overall game was good. There were just a few things that decreased the game value slightly. The game is a Kickstarter game, which isn’t necessarily special or bad, there are many games funded by Kickstarter. Haiku just feels obvious and more like fan service at times. Within the world you talk to some friendly robots that give advice or add to the narrative. When you talk to them, their name shows up and underneath it gives a small description of what they do. If a Kickstarter backer named the robot, though, that person’s name appears underneath the robot’s name. Seeing this breaks me from the game and brings me to reality. In this game world you wouldn’t see human names because there are no humans left. There is also a bug where if you’re using the elevator in the factory area and jump off your character still gets pulled down and glitches through the world (this is a Unity programming problem where the player game object is being set as a child to the platform game object.

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Haiku The Robot Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

I would either make a trigger right above the platform that releases the player if they jump away from it, or not allow the player to move at all and make the elevator move faster). Haiku, the Robot is a metroidvania style game being solo developed by Jordan Morris of Mister Morris Games, based out of Tallinn, Estonia; featuring an amazing soundtrack by Guy Jones. Jordan Morris is a self taught pixel artist and animator with a background of 4 years in project planning and execution for an IT software company — he knows where he is going and how to get there — and I am excited for it. The demo showed one of the many different levels in the post human world of Haiku: exploring the world with eerie, somber background music that felt isolating in a way that I haven’t enjoyed in a solo adventure in a long time. The hack and slash mechanics that ooze “big protagg energy” juxtaposing the dangers of the enemies you come across: each hand drawn and animated to give plenty of character and personality. Starting appropriately lacking in many abilities and ways to defend oneself, I quickly dove into exploring every corner and crevice I could, with well spaced rewards for my wanderings between the power ups and new skills to dink around with.  Ghostbusters Spirits Unleashed

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