Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download

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Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET


Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET Casual Challenge Players’ Club is a top-down pool game from Yume Game Studio and is part of a larger series of anime-based casual titles. The top-down view is how most pool/snooker games were presented back in the ’80s and ’90s until the now typical 3D view became the way to do it, so this is very much a throwback to games like Arcade Pool. You play as a nameless anime archetype, the guy who looks like he’s 15 but has slightly more formal wear and grey hair to indicate some sort of seniority. You’ve been invited to an elite club that only invites the best players in the country to compete for membership and trophies. The challenges are set to you by three anime girls who have different hairstyles but no discernable noses. The single player campaign has 14 levels but, oddly, these are set across three frames of pool. Kind of. Right, it’s a little bit odd but round one has you breaking off with a four ball rack. You’re tasked with potting all four balls but you have a miss counter. Use up all your misses and it’s frame over. Then you’ll get a few rounds where the balls are placed around the table. If you’ve ever played pool or snooker by yourself, sometimes in an effort to not be entirely rubbish. TOP/BEST ADULT VIDEO GAMES IN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (USA)

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

You might place balls near the pockets so that you can put together a little break. Well that’s what these levels are like. Most of the shots are almost gimmes. Anyway, after a few rounds of that, you’ll get a round where you break off with six balls. This is followed by more of those super easy rounds (oddly with four balls most of the time). And then you’ll eventually get to a nine ball frame. Followed by a few more easy rounds. Beat round 12 and you get the Platinum trophy. Beat round 14 and you’ve completed the game and are now Japan’s most elite pool player. Considering that this is meant to be an exclusive club of the country’s best pool players, the round layouts are very easy. Also, you never play any other players (there are literally no AI matches available in any mode). Which is also quite odd. But I guess the ‘Casual’ in Casual Challenge Players’ Club is there for a reason, right? What makes the game a little trickier are the actual mechanics of playing pool. The top-down view makes lining up shots quite difficult, your shot indicator doesn’t show where the target ball will go either so initially it all seems like a bit of a nightmare.

4 Game Modes.

However, this is balanced by the physics (which are reasonably accommodating and simplified from real life) and the generous pockets which are very forgiving. Also, the number of misses you get for each table are plentiful enough that you’ll struggle to fail at any point in the game. Oddly, unlike every pool game in existence, you’ve got no spin control at all. If anything, that’s pretty unforgivable. Even Angleball on the ZX Spectrum had spin controls and that game got very middling reviews in 1987. There’s just no excusing it in a modern game. Also, the table physics are completely off with balls slowing as if the table is made of sandpaper. Also, look at the state of this controls screen. Another annoyance is the control system. With no spin to deal with all you’ve got is aiming and shooting. The shooting involves you tapping to start your power bar off and then tap it again to shoot. So you’d be expecting it to automatically stop at full power, right? Or start decreasing? Nope, it loops. Honestly, it’s a small thing but so powerfully unintuitive, it’s as if the developer has never played a pool game in their life. Gas Station Simulator Switch NSP

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Once you’ve beaten the campaign (which should take you no more than 15 minutes) all that is left are a couple of local versus modes (for if you can find someone else to play this with you who won’t hate you for it) and the ‘Master Mode’ which gives you 16 misses with which to beat all of the rounds. Now you might think that means all 14 levels but it doesn’t. Instead it’s just the three where you break off. The structure of this game makes so little Visually, the game opts for a very plain 2D look with no use of lighting. It looks like an old Flash game while the music offers three tracks, one of which has the most annoying percussive kick drum sound we’ve ever heard. Aside from the very quick double Platinum, Casual Challenge Players’ Club offers such a thin package that it’s really impossible to recommend. It lacks any kind of realism, challenge, flair or even love for the sport that it recreates. We don’t really get it. Unfortunately, Casual Challenge Players’ Club is not a very good pool game, and its inclusion of anime girls is superfluous at best, making the entire package feel like a bit of a waste of time for everyone involved.

Play Locally With Your Friends.

Which is a shame, really, because the concept is solid — it’s just almost every aspect of the execution that lets Casual Challenge Players’ Club down. Let’s start with the anime girls. They appear as part of some visual novel-style sequences that provide some context to the game’s main mode. The game’s protagonist, a non-descript white-haired chap who we’re given no reason whatsoever to care about, has apparently been invited to an extremely exclusive pool club — so exclusive, it seems, that none of its members know how to play pool properly — but first has to prove himself with a series of challenges on the baize. These levels are divided into three distinct levels, each of which is hosted by an anime-style girl with the exact same facial features but a different haircut and clothing, making it abundantly clear that they were almost certainly created with some sort of generic anime girl creation software. These anime-style girls do not have names, nor do they have any personalities whatsoever. They are there for no other reason than to look vaguely nice. And as the true waifu connoisseur will gladly tell you at great length, there is much, much more to making a compelling anime girl character than simply making her look nice. Nuclear Throne

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

So we’re not off to a great start, and things get even worse when you realise that it’s impossible to press a button to advance the text more quickly — a standard feature in pretty much every single visual novel since the beginning of time. Instead, each line of dialogue simply sits around on screen until it’s good and ready to advance — and no, of course there isn’t any voice acting to go along with this. You just either wait, or hit a button to skip the entire sequence. Which, honestly, you might as well do, given how little character these scenes have to them. Then we come to the pool action, which appears to have been put together by someone who assumes that all pool is played on a polished chrome table on a planet with an incredibly thin atmosphere, meaning that the slightest tap of a ball causes it to go careening across the entire table at rocket speed, pinging around like a pinball until it eventually comes to a stop. Oh, and the controls for the pool action have such significant input lag that if you press the button when the power meter is full, by the time the game registers it, said meter will have wrapped back around to near-zero power, meaning many a wasted shot. Also you can’t put spin on the ball in any way, the aiming line is imprecise.

2 Modes For a Single Player.

The animations on the balls are poor and not a single one of the different modes in the game is in any way “proper pool”. And the music sounds like it was downloaded from a late ’90s MIDI repository. And I want a sandwich. The last bit isn’t relevant, but I thought while I was complaining I might as well slip it in there. The main game mode consists of three main levels of five tables each. The first of these tables is a score challenge, where you get 100 points for each ball potted, plus 50 points per ball you pot on consecutive shots, and 100 points per remaining shots you have after all of the balls have been potted. This is similar to the “arcade pool” implementation found in games like Side Pocket, but lacks the additional depth of being able to pot the balls in numerical or colour order, as well as the escalating bonuses for longer “combos”. Once you’ve cleared this initial score attack table, you’re then presented with a series of simple pool problems in which you have six shots to pot all the balls from their predefined positions. Fail to do this and you get a “Game Over” — though you can simply continue from where you left off from the main menu.

Which reminds me: to go along with the inability to advance more quickly through the visual novel dialogue sequences, you also can’t skip the main menu’s intro animation, which is extremely annoying if you find yourself having to repeatedly retry the level. Other game modes include a Versus mode, in which two players (there’s no CPU option) face off against one another to score the most points using the “100 points per ball plus combo bonuses” rules; a “Black Ball” rule in which all you have to do is pot the black ball first; and a “Like a Master” mode in which you must clear the three score attack tables against a time limit, carrying over your additional remaining shots to the next table. Instead of supporting standard 8-Ball or 9-Ball rulesets, the game puts more approachable, but still highly challenging, pool tasks against the player. The main mode places a handful of preset balls on the table and the player needs to sink them in a certain number of shots. Clearing each stage unlocks one Trophy until the Platinum is earn (the Switch version obviously doesn’t have Trophies). Unfortunately, you have to clear stage 3 to gain access to stage 4 and you cannot select each stage at will.

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP Free Download GAMESPACK.NET

The Versus mode is self-explanatory and is limited to local multiplayer. Black Ball is another local multiplayer-only experience that is basically 9-Ball only you can hit any ball in any order and need to sink the black 8-ball instead. Finally, the Like A Master mode is just like the standard mode except the player can also put a tedious timer on clearing each table with the shot limit. Not sure why anyone would want to do this especially since there is no leaderboard option, but hey, it is here. Offering adjusted standard Pool rules is interesting but the overall gameplay is restricted and overly challenging due to the limited information given to the player. The dotted shot indicator is very short and doesn’t identify the angle when making contact with the other balls on the table. Making matters worse, it is almost impossible to make a connection from cross-table shots simple due to the distance, let alone hit balls with any sort of accuracy. This, in combination with the inaccurate power meter (the meter keeps going for a second even after you stop it), makes clearing each table much more reliant on luck than skill. Plus, the balls move as if they were velcro’d the table; they almost stop in place even after connecting with a powerful shot.  Embr 

ADD ONS/PATCHES AND DLC’S: Casual Challenge Players’ Club Switch NSP

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